My top 5 favorite papers

Versión en español aquí

As the title says, this is a totally subjective list of my favorite papers. I’m of course biased in terms of subjects and authors because of my own field of study and interests.

But how does a paper get into my list of favorites? The requirements are:

  1. How much they motivated me. Motivation is, in my opinion, the most important thing in science (and maybe in any other thing you do in your life?). The papers in this list made me feel like starting working immediately after I finished reading them. In short, these are papers that made me excited about what I could (and can) do in the near future.
  2. How clear they are. Hard-to-read papers are boring papers, and in consequence they won’t be my favorite papers. This is of course subjective. I don’t know a lot of things, which means a lot of papers will be “bad” or “boring” for me. This obviously does not mean they are really bad papers, but this is a personal list. However, I don’t think clarity is always a subjective characteristic. Papers tackling very similar subjects can be different in the way they flow when you read them. Papers that flow easily are more likely to make sense in your mind.

The combination of these two characteristics is what makes a paper good to me. A paper cannot motivate if you cannot understand it, and a paper won’t necessarily motivate you even if it is clearly written.

And again, this is a personal list with personal requirements 🙂 It is also an incomplete list, because (1) I will read hundreds of papers in the future, some of which will probably enter this list, and (2) I probably forgot some papers that I would put here.

That being said let’s start!

5

5

A morphological analysis of the structure of communities of lizards in desert habitats
Ricklefs, R. E., Cochran, D., & Pianka, E. R. (1981). Ecology62(6), 1474-1483.

AND

Toward a periodic table of niches, or exploring the lizard niche hypervolume
Pianka, E. R., Vitt, L. J., Pelegrin, N., Fitzgerald, D. B., & Winemiller, K. O. (2017). The American Naturalist190(5), 601-616.

Let me start this list with a tie. The macro-scale analyses performed by Pianka several decades ago always motivated me during my first years in science. In some ways these two papers are the past and present of the study of macro-ecological studies in lizards.

You might love or hate these kind of analyses and you might even think that the second paper is just a “let’s put everything together and see what we get” kind of thing. But yeah, this is exactly the kind of study I find very interesting. I will justify myself mentioning that I feel identified with the “journey to an unexplored land” archetype, which is one that E. O. Wilson uses to categorize motivations to do science. I just want to see what is going on there.

In summary, both papers motivated me in different ways and in different times. Ricklefs et al in a more theoretical way, even supplying me with some methods for past work, and Pianka et al in a …visual way? I just think it’s amazing to see the “space” different groups of animals occupy when they are represented by their morphologies and niches.

4

4

On optimal use of a patchy environment
MacArthur, R. H., & Pianka, E. R. (1966). The American Naturalist100(916), 603-609.

This is probably the paper to which I dedicated more hours. Not because it is long or hard to read (it is actually the opposite of that) but because its clarity and simplicity motivated me to take this theoretical paper to an R code. I have an ongoing project with a friend in which we plan to expand the theoretical framework of this paper to see how it behaves when adding other parameters. Exciting!

This paper basically models the number of resource patches an individual should bother to visit considering the quality of the patch, how far it is and the cost of movement and hunting the predator must pay when visiting the different patches. The same theoretical framework can be applied to model the optimal number of different diet items in the predator’s diet.

Last but not least, this is a classical paper. If you are an ecologist or evolutionary biologist you should probably read it.

3

3

Natural history constrains the macroevolution of foot morphology in European plethodontid salamanders
Adams, D. C., Korneisel, D., Young, M., & Nistri, A. (2017). The American Naturalist190(2), 292-297.

This is a short paper (is in the “natural history notes” section!) that shows in a super simple way one of my greatest interests, which is phenotypic evolution. In this paper we have a particular genus of salamanders. These salamanders are exceptional in their natural history, as they occupy caves and crevices where they can be found clinging.

At this point a simple hypothesis appears: the rate of evolution of the foot in these cave salamanders should be slower when compared to other morphological traits; this because foot morphology is believed to be highly relevant for climbing, which these salamanders do all the time. Moreover, the authors hypothesize that foot morphology should also evolve at a slower pace when compared to other non-climbing salamanders.

Yes, both hypotheses were supported by the results.

(Fun fact about how I found this paper: I was lucky enough to meet Dean Adams in person and to chat with him for like an hour, discussing different things (I had, of course, more to listen than to say in that meeting). At the end he recommended me to read this paper. And yes, you see it was a good recommendation).

2

2

Rapid large-scale evolutionary divergence in morphology and performance associated with exploitation of a different dietary resource
Herrel, A., Huyghe, K., Vanhooydonck, B., Backeljau, T., Breugelmans, K., Grbac, I., Van Damme, R. & Irschick, D. J. (2008). Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences105(12), 4792-4795.

This is one of those papers that has been with me since almost the beginning of my academic life. I like it because it supported some hypothesis I had for my undergrad thesis (and also for posterior papers). The paper shows how a radical change in diet causes rapid changes in the morphology of a population of lizards. These morphological changes are not only external (like head shape), but also appear on the internal organs.

The main point of the paper might be that ecological changes can cause phenotypic adaptation in very short time scales. However, the fact that this ecological change was a dietary shift from insectivory to herbivory has been highly relevant for a large portion of my past and present work, which is related to morphological changes caused by a herbivorous diet.

Extra fact: this paper will probably become a classic in the topic of rapid evolution, as it has already been used as an example of fast adaptation in Richard Dawkins’ The Greatest Show on Earth.

1

1 (1)

Are rates of species diversification correlated with rates of morphological evolution?
Adams, D. C., Berns, C. M., Kozak, K. H., & Wiens, J. J. (2009). Proceedings of the Royal Society of London B: Biological Sciences, rspb-2009.

I was surprised by how easy and entertaining this paper was to read. Even more important was that I remember thinking things like “I can apply this same method” or “I could do that on my data” while reading it. On the same week I read this paper I started working on my own data applying similar methods, which was quite exciting. I clearly remember finishing the paper and thinking “this is my favorite paper so far”, and I guess the fact that I’m putting it in 1st place in this list proves that I was not exaggerating!

The paper is basically what it says in the title (and as I approach the end of the post I also start to get too lazy to describe it hehe). The authors test for a correlation between rates of species diversification and morphological evolution in 190 species of salamanders. They found no correlation, which indicates that species diversification can occur with no need of morphological diversification and vice-versa. Nowadays the methods for measuring rates of species diversification cast a lot of doubts among evolutionary biologists, however methods to measure trait evolution are well supported and the possibility to apply them in macro-scales as in this study keeps me as excited as the first time I read it.

Honorable mentions

It was impossible to keep only 5 papers so I added this section to mention some additional ones.
Niche overlap and diffuse competition
Pianka, E. R. (1974). Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences71(5), 2141-2145.

Another theoretical paper by Pianka. A classic.

Ecomorphological variation in male and female wall lizards and the macroevolution of sexual dimorphism in relation to habitat use
Kaliontzopoulou, A., Carretero, M. A., & Adams, D. C. (2015). Journal of evolutionary biology28(1), 80-94.

As I started entering the sexual dimorphism field for my PhD thesis it was nice to find a paper merging that subject together with macroevolution and ecomorphology, my other two big interests.

Testing the hypothesis that a clade has adaptively radiated: iguanid lizard clades as a case study
Losos, J. B., & Miles, D. B. (2002). The American Naturalist160(2), 147-157.

It helped me in the past when I needed to compare groups of lizards in terms of morphological diversity. It was “methodologically inspiring”.

***Images in places 5, 4 and 1 were extracted from the respective papers. Images in 2 and 3 have a CC BY 2.0 license.


Mi top 5 de papers favoritos

 

Como lo dice el título, esta es una lista totalmente subjetiva de mis papers (a.k.a. artículos científicos) favoritos. Por supuesto estoy totalmente sesgado en relación a los temas y autores de estos papers debido a mi propia área de estudio y mis intereses.

Pero cómo es un paper que entra en mi lista de favoritos? Los requerimientos son:

  1. Qué tanto me motivaron. La motivación es, en mi opinión, la cosa más importante dentro de la ciencia (y tal vez en cualquier cosa que hagas en la vida?). Los papers en esta lista me hicieron sentir ganas de empezar a trabajar ni bien los terminé de leer. En corto, estos papers me ilusionaron mucho acerca de lo que pude (y aún podría) hacer en un futuro cercano.
  2. Lo claros que son. Un paper que es difícil de leer es un paper aburrido, y en consecuencia no será un paper que entre en mi lista de favoritos. Esto es, por supuesto, subjetivo. Hay muchas cosas que no se, lo que significa que mucho papers serán “malos” o “aburridos” para mí. Esto obviamente no significa que son realmente malos papers, pero esto es una lista personal. En todo caso, no creo que la claridad sea siempre una característica subjetiva. Papers que abordan temas muy similares pueden ser diferentes en su fluidez al momento de leerlos. Papers que fluyen fácilmente tienen mayores probabilidades de tener sentido en tu cabeza.

La combinación de estas dos características es lo que hace a un paper bueno en mi opinión. Un paper no puede motivarte si es que no lo puedes entender, y un paper no te motivará necesariamente aunque esté escrito de manera clara.

Y de nuevo, esta es una lista personal con requerimientos y condiciones personales 🙂 Es también una lista incompleta, porque (1) leeré cientos de papers en el futuro, algunos de los cuales probablemente entrarán en esta lista, y (2) probablemente haya olvidado algunos papers que pondría aquí.

Habiendo dicho esto, empecemos!

5

5

A morphological analysis of the structure of communities of lizards in desert habitats
Ricklefs, R. E., Cochran, D., & Pianka, E. R. (1981). Ecology62(6), 1474-1483.

Y

Toward a periodic table of niches, or exploring the lizard niche hypervolume
Pianka, E. R., Vitt, L. J., Pelegrin, N., Fitzgerald, D. B., & Winemiller, K. O. (2017). The American Naturalist190(5), 601-616.

Empezaré esta lista con un empate. Los análisis a una escala macro hechos por Pianka hace varias décadas siempre me motivaron durante mis primeros años haciendo ciencia. De algún modo estos dos papers son el pasado y el presente de los estudios macro-ecológicos en lagartijas.

Puede que ames u odies este tipo de análisis y puede que pienses que el segundo paper es solo un “pongamos todo junto y veamos que pasa”. Pero bueno, este es exactamente el tipo de estudio que encuentro fascinante. Intentaré justificarme mencionando que me siento identificado con el arquetipo “viajero a tierras inexploradas”, el cual es uno que E. O. Wilson usa para categorizar las distintas motivaciones para hacer ciencia. Yo solo quiero ver qué está pasando ahí.

En resumen, ambos papers me motivaron de distintas formas en diferentes momentos. Ricklefs et al en una forma más teórica, incluso brindándome algunos métodos que utilicé en trabajos pasados, y Pianka et al en una forma más… visual? Simplemente creo que es genial observar el “espacio” que distintos grupos de animales ocupan cuando estos están representados por sus morfologías y nichos.

4

4

On optimal use of a patchy environment
MacArthur, R. H., & Pianka, E. R. (1966). The American Naturalist100(916), 603-609.

Este es probablemente el paper al que he dedicado más horas. No porque sea largo o difícil de leer (en realidad es lo opuesto a eso) sino debido a que su claridad y simplicidad me motivaron a llevar este paper teórico a un script de R. Tengo un proyecto con un amigo en el que planeamos expandir la teoría de este paper para ver cómo se comporta al añadir otros parámetros. Emocionante!

Este paper básicamente modela el número de “parches de recursos” que un individuo debería molestarse en visitar considerando la calidad del parche, su lejanía y el costo de movimiento y caza que el depredador debe pagar al visitar los diferentes parches. La misma teoría puede ser aplicada para modelar el número óptimo de items de dieta diferentes en la dieta del depredador.

Por último pero no menos importante, este es un paper clásico. Si eres un ecólogo o un biólogo evolutivo probablemente deberías leerlo.

3

3

Natural history constrains the macroevolution of foot morphology in European plethodontid salamanders
Adams, D. C., Korneisel, D., Young, M., & Nistri, A. (2017). The American Naturalist190(2), 292-297.

Este es un paper corto (es parte de la sección “notas de historia natural”!!) que muestra en una manera muy sencilla uno de mis más grandes intereses, que es la evolución fenotípica. En este paper tenemos un género muy particular de salamandras. Estas salamandras son excepcionales en su historia natural, ya que ocupan cuevas y grietas que es donde se las puede encontrar colgadas.

En este punto una hipótesis simple aparece: La tasa de evolución del pie en estas salamandras debería ser más lenta comparada a la de otros rasgos morfológicos; esto debido a que la morfología del pie parece ser muy relevante para trepar estas cuevas, lo que estas salamandras hacen todo el tiempo. Además, los autores presentan una hipótesis bajo la cual la morfología del pie deberían también evolucionar a una tasa más lenta comparada con otras salamandras que no viven colgadas en las paredes de las cuevas.

Y sí, ambas hipótesis son respaldadas por los resultados.

(Dato curioso acerca de cómo encontré este paper: Tuve la suerte de conocer a Dean Adams en persona y de conversar con él por más o menos una hora, discutiendo varias cosas (Por supuesto yo tenía más que escuchar de lo que tenía para hablar en nuestra reunión). Al final me recomendó leer este paper. Y sí, aparentemente fue una buena recomendación).

2

2

Rapid large-scale evolutionary divergence in morphology and performance associated with exploitation of a different dietary resource
Herrel, A., Huyghe, K., Vanhooydonck, B., Backeljau, T., Breugelmans, K., Grbac, I., Van Damme, R. & Irschick, D. J. (2008). Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences105(12), 4792-4795.

Este es uno de esos papers que han estado conmigo desde casi el comienzo de mi vida académica. Me gusta porque respaldó algunas hipótesis que tuve para mi tesis de pregrado (y también algunos papers posteriores). El paper muestra cómo un cambio repentino en la dieta puede ocasionar cambios muy rápidos en la morfología de una población de lagartijas. Estos cambios morfológicos no son solo externos (como la forma de la cabeza), sino que también aparecen en órganos internos.

El punto principal de este paper podría ser que cambios ecológicos pueden causar adaptación fenotípica en escalas de tiempo muy pequeñas. Sin embargo, el hecho que este cambio ecológico fuera un cambio de una dieta insectívora a una herbívora fue muy relevante para una gran porción de mi trabajo pasado y también el presente, el cual está relacionado a cambios morfológicos causados por una dieta herbívora.

Dato extra: Este paper probablemente se convierta en un clásico en el tema de evolución rápida, ya que ha sido usado como ejemplo de adaptación rápida en el libro The Greatest Show on Earth de Richard Dawkins.

1

1 (1)

Are rates of species diversification correlated with rates of morphological evolution?
Adams, D. C., Berns, C. M., Kozak, K. H., & Wiens, J. J. (2009). Proceedings of the Royal Society of London B: Biological Sciences, rspb-2009.

Me sorprendió lo fácil y entretenido que fue este paper. Incluso más importante es que al leerlo pensaba cosas como “creo que puedo aplicar este mismo método” o “podría hacer esto con mis datos”. En la misma semana en que leí este paper empecé a trabajar con mis propios datos aplicando métodos similares, lo cual fue bastante emocionante. Recuerdo claramente terminar de leer el paper y pensar “este es mi paper favorito hasta ahora”, y creo que el hecho de estar poniéndolo en el primer lugar de esta lista prueba que no estaba exagerando!

Este paper se trata básicamente de lo que dice el título (y como ya estoy en la última parte del post empiezo a sentir flojera de describirlo jaja). Los autores tratan de encontrar una correlación entre las tasas de diversificación de especies y de evolución morfológica en 190 especies de salamandras. No se encontró ninguna correlación, lo cual indica que la diversificación de especies puede ocurrir sin necesidad de diversificación morfológica y vice-versa. Hoy en día los métodos para medir tasas de diversificación de especies crean muchas dudas entre los biólogos evolutivos, sin embargo los métodos para medir tasas de evolución fenotípica están bien sustentados y la posibilidad de aplicarlos a una escala macro como en este estudio me mantiene tan motivado como en la primera vez que lo leí.

Menciones honrosas

Fue imposible considerar solo 5 papers así que añadí esta sección para mencionar algunos más.
Niche overlap and diffuse competition
Pianka, E. R. (1974). Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences71(5), 2141-2145.

Otro paper teórico de Pianka. Un clásico.

Ecomorphological variation in male and female wall lizards and the macroevolution of sexual dimorphism in relation to habitat use
Kaliontzopoulou, A., Carretero, M. A., & Adams, D. C. (2015). Journal of evolutionary biology28(1), 80-94.

Ya que empecé a entrar en el terreno del dimorfismo sexual para mi PhD fue muy bueno encontrar un paper que combinaba este tema con macro-evolución y ecomorfología, mis otros dos grandes intereses.

Testing the hypothesis that a clade has adaptively radiated: iguanid lizard clades as a case study
Losos, J. B., & Miles, D. B. (2002). The American Naturalist160(2), 147-157.

Me ayudó en el pasado cuando necesité comparar grupos de lagartijas en términos de diversidad morfológica. Fue “metodológicamente inspirador”.

***Las imágenes de los puestos 5, 4 y 1 fueron extraídas de los respectvos papers. Imágenes en 2 y 3 tienen licencia CC BY 2.0

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s